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HomeEconomyMasks no longer mandatory as South Africa lifts all COVID-19 restrictions MPNRC
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Masks no longer mandatory as South Africa lifts all COVID-19 restrictions MPNRC

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South Africans heaved a sigh of relief as Health Minister Joe Fahla announced they would no longer be forced to wear masks or ban public gatherings as the government imposed more than two years on because of the COVID-19 pandemic All remaining restrictions have been removed. Proof of vaccination will also no longer be required at all ports of entry.

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“After monitoring the positive direction for more than three weeks, we came to the conclusion that the peak infection, which we concluded was a limited 5th wave driven by the sub-variant and not a new form of concern, Extinction was occurring and that there was no more any eminent risk, Fahla said on Wednesday. The minister said he had signed the note in the government gazette issuing all the remaining health regulations after the National Coronavirus Command Council, which was set up by President Cyril Ramaphosa in March 2020, and the cabinet approved his recommendation.

But Fahla also urged that vaccination should continue. “The Covid-19 virus is still in our midst. He said that we are stronger than ever, especially with vaccination and we urge those who have not yet been vaccinated and those who are due for a booster, also come forward.

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The vaccination program will remain in place but will now be integrated into general health services, Fahla confirmed. Acknowledging that although the government’s objective of vaccinating 70 per cent of the adult population has not been achieved, Fahla said that half of the entire population has received at least one jab.

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He also said that the Omicron variant is driving the fourth wave, with its rapid spread affecting the largest number of people in a short span of time, leading to increased natural immunity, which has led to a drop in daily cases. Very positive direction was found, hospitalization positivity rate, fertility numbers and number of reported deaths. Fahla also confirmed that the first case of monkeypox in South Africa was identified in a 30-year-old male from Johannesburg with no travel history, which suggested it could not be attributed to being acquired outside South Africa. Is.

“The National Health Laboratory Service is conducting online service training for our health workers to help them detect disease so that necessary laboratory tests can be performed,” Fahla said. Monkeypox is a mild disease that usually appears as blisters on the skin. It is usually mild and self-limiting, with a fatality rate of 1 percent.

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